time machine

Oh, 20th Reunion Weekend… it continues. And after all my grumbling, it seems to be a success, and everyone is having a wonderful time (me included).

So much silliness. Friday night was meet-and-greet at a local bar. All I can say is that there were splits involved, and a shirtless guy, and then later that night, a bonfire, inappropriate jokes, midnight pedicures. Time machine. We were all around 18 for a night.

Yesterday was a local wine-tasting tour, ending up at a classmate’s charming winery (below). We had a lovely time, more silliness, and then it was off to set up the big dinner.

Charming and wonderful and everyone brought beautiful spouses and filled out my trivia contest and hugged and laughed and looked at yearbooks. It was everything you’d wish a 20th reunion would be. No stress, just fun. (thank you to my classmate Hedie who saved the day by hosting the event at her lovely home!)

A dear long lost friend showed up and surprised me, which is exactly why reunions are wonderful and why people keep doing them. These relationships are important. They remind you of who you were, and who you are, and whom you love.

And some people keep you honest daily (best friend Erin, whom I’ve known, literally, my entire life)

Today we meet up at a local park with kids and families and lawn games for a relaxed picnic day. I have no duties other than to attend. I’m a bit tired but it’s been so much fun, that everyone is asking if we can do a 25-year. I’m thinking… yes. Sometimes small, requiring almost no effort on my part, no ‘ticket’, just fun.

Small towns are good for some things, it seems. Close classmates is one of them.

This also renews my desire for community. I’d like to be involved in something that requires knowing lots of people, being involved in something bigger than myself, being known. I have been tucked away for far too long.

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it’s a secret that I think your idea is bad

Can you spot me? (hint: middle row) This is my kindergarten photo. 1979. Yes!

My 20th high school reunion is on July 7th. I’m planning it. I’m from a very small town, and half the kids I graduated with attended all 13 years of school together. We’re tight-knit, as reunion groups go. So people want this thing to happen. I have some help (one lone helper…), but this is stressing me out. People do NOT communicate well. I have resorted to bombarding people with increasingly shrill emails and Facebook messages in a valiant attempt to figure out who is coming to which event.

I have also been informed that many people feel the ticket price for the formal dinner/dance/event was too high ($40). However, no one bothered to share that with me, and I had put the formal dinner together because the general consensus was that people wanted “something nice.” However, they do not want to pay for “something nice.” Which is completely fine and understandable, but if someone would have just said… “Maybe we could do a pizza night instead?” I would have jumped on it.

So now, since hardly anyone has RSVP’d… you guessed it! I’m on the verge of canceling the fancy dinner and pulling together a last-minute pizza party. Pizza places always have banquet rooms (sometimes for free) and it’s pretty easy to pull together a pizza party with little notice. I’m completely fine with this — I’m just upset that no one bothered to give me feedback, even as I BEGGED for feedback. This is not the first time I’ve noticed this phenomenon.

It will be fun. People will come. Right? I’m Class President and I have the power, so I can just say, “Screw ya’ll!” and cancel the whole thing if that seems necessary, so really, it will be fine either way.

However, for our 30th reunion? I think it’s going to be bar night on Friday, and pizza night on Saturday, and call it good. And guess what? THAT will be the time when people will grumble about it ‘being kind of cheap.’

(people! if your class is having a reunion and you don’t want to come — please just tell the organizer that! If you want to be extra-nice, let them know WHY. Maybe it can be fixed.)